Category Archives: School library lessons

Library Lessons: Oct 23-27, 2017

Week 9!  All should be fine…but this is real life.  See 3rd grade!

PreK:

We kicked off our BEARS unit with two of my favorites that I brought to London from the USA.  The good: the stories were well received. The bad: they need more movement, and the riddles weren’t the best for this group.  Hmm…  Reflection and revision is needed.

Grades K/1:

The final week in our Peter Brown author study!  Being that it was the week before Halloween, we read the 2017 release Creepy Pair of Underwear.  The goal? To compare/contrast it with Creepy Carrots using a Venn Diagram.  Result?  Success, even though they’d never used a Venn Diagram before!

Grade 2:

Week 3 of our Haiku Animals unit.  This week: accessing PebbleGo and writing 3 bullet-point notes on a chosen animal. And citation, in limited form.  Students had a mostly-complete citation on their note-taking form, and they had to discern the part missing…then fill in the blank.  It was a developmentally appropriate way to introduce citing sources.

The 2nd graders are across the board in their ability to read/write/note-take.  This was a surprisingly successful lesson which had everyone engaged and focused.  Next week: videos with ChatterPix Kids!

Grade 3:

Okay.  So, these were the best laid plans.  Students were going to use Destiny and write reviews using SWBST.  BUT.  Destiny was being a bear (not its fault…something deeper).  Passwords and usernames were changing overnight, and I didn’t know why.  When 25% of the class can’t log in, it doesn’t matter how many students there are – the lesson still goes to pot in under 30 seconds.  Suffice to say, of my two 3rd grade classes, we only attempted logging in with one.  The 2nd did this lesson orally.

Grade 4:

You know those moments when a one-off lesson turns into something more?  That’s what happened here.  Last week, students gave feedback and input regarding our library home page in Destiny.  Little did we realize that the SINGLE link every student chose as a “good” link to keep was this one:  Teachers’ Top 100 Books for Children

Click the link.  What do you notice?  As we shared in class, the list was created by the NEA, which is trustworthy organization.  However…when was it published?  Not one child noticed this little detail: the list was 18 years old! This was the perfect way to teach copyright and checking to see when a website was created.  I absolutely love when lessons like this create themselves!

This is going to lead into our next unit: FAKE NEWS, using Laurie Thompson & Ammi-Joan Paquette’s Two Truths and a Lie, where looking at a site’s author is a key skill.

Until then…

Cheers, y’all!  –arika

Library Lessons: Oct 30-Nov 3, 2017

Week 10!

PreK:

Week 2 of the BEARS unit.

Two stories, one set of riddles, a giant bear walk around the library…and I should have had more.  Note to self: 40 minutes with 4 year olds requires a LOT of activities, especially when they take less than 5 minutes to select books and check out!

Grades K/1:

Week 1 of a new author study with MAC BARNETT.  Mac is one of my favorite

Each week in this study, I’ll be teaching how to read a spine label on a book. With LEO, the 2 questions listed are WRONG! (I saved the wrong slide…oops!). Students reacted to what they wondered about the story.

Grade 2:

Week 4 in our Haiku Animals study.  Week 1, Week 2, and Week 3 are here.  (note: this would be a 3 week unit if students are already familiar with PebbleGo. Mine were not.)

This week, students used their notes to share information learned.  They created short videos using ChatterPix.

Here were the directions, made using ChatterPix:

And here was a sample video I made using the notes I took during one of the classes:

At the end of the lesson, students uploaded their videos to Seesaw.  Want to know more about how I use Seesaw in the library?  INFO TO COME!

Grade 3:

Goal: students will brainstorm wonder questions following a reading of Katherine Applegate’s Ivan: the remarkably true story of a shopping mall gorilla.

Why are we doing this?  Well, Destiny has been a beast, and not all students are able to access it at this point (I’m working on discovering WHY this is).  Until Destiny allows all students equal, successful access, we are taking a break. A mini-unit on nonfiction and research is just what the librarian ordered!

Next week, we’ll do a group research lesson on identifying trustworthy websites and using keywords as we search online for answers to the questions.

Grade 4:

Week 1 of a 5 week unit on FAKE NEWS!

This week, prior knowledge of fake news kicked off our discussion.  Students knew A LOT and kept bringing up certain US-based examples – even in an international school!  We played a short game of “two truths and a lie” to get them prepared for the 3 stories we read in Ammi-Joan Paquette & Laurie Ann Thompson’s book, as most had never heard of it.  Interestingly, two students were able to correctly identify my LIE using nothing but reasoning.  Hint: it involves knowledge of history!

As a class, I read aloud Chapter 5 from Two Truths and a Lie. Recognizing the challenge of reading a book like this aloud, I scanned the pages into a PPT so that children could read along (another idea: use a doc camera…I don’t have one, so scanning worked).  This lesson allowed discussion on how nonfiction books are read (one can skip and choose) and text features in nonfiction (captions, bold words, photographs, etc). We talked about keywords to search, which we’ll be doing next week.

Cheers, y’all!  –arika

Library Lessons: Oct 9-13, 2017

Week 8.  It’s great!  Routines are mostly set.  Expectations, too.  It was a short week (2 days of conferences AND book fair).

NO PreK / K / Grade 1…due to conference days.

Grade 2:

Week 1 in a research unit, designed to fuse PebbleGo, note-taking, citation, and video creation with haiku poetry.  And while this book was a bit young for the 2nd graders, it worked really well with Claim-Evidence-Reasoning…which was the goal of today’s lesson.  Next week: RESEARCH with our newest database, PebbleGo!

Grades 3/4:

So, the Destiny home screen is in need of an update. When  a handful of students per class  don’t realize they’re on the wrong catalog because most of the 11 in our school group look identical, there is an issue.  Step 1: survey the students to see what they think of the current set-up. They are the end-user, so their voice and opinions are the most valuable!  Using their iPads (we are 1:1), they could work independently or with a small group to answer 3 questions: what is GOOD, what SHOULD be here, how should it LOOK?   Following the discussion, three options for a Destiny home page were shared:  one from Van Meter in Iowa (thanks Shannon McClintock Miller), one from my former school (thanks, Nanette!), and our current screen (a list of links).  With little fanfare but much enthusiasm, they were most impressed with a home screen setup like at Van Meter.  Next: a redesign using Symbaloo!

Cheers, y’all!  –arika

Library Lessons: Nov 6-10, 2017

Week 11!

PreK: Week 3 of our BEARS unit.

As always, we begin with the Hello Song.  This week, the bear unit included a bear walk around the library, with Teacher Bear and Student Bears. Why?  More movement!  More interaction!  More BEARS!  And what a coincidence that they’ve started bear walks in PE!

For this week, there was a lot of action.  After reading Brown Bear, Brown Bear, What Do You See?, we acted out the story with these fantastic (free) printable cards. I handed each student an animal card (duplicate if needed), then they came up to the front when their animal was read in the story.  In We’re Going on a Bear Hunt, we moved our hands (and bodies!) all around to the motions of the story.  It was a wiggle-free, yet movement-filled, class!

Grades K/1:

More Mac? Yes, please!  Connecting Mac Barnett’s Count the Monkeys with our newest database, PebbleGo, was a seamless lesson.  Students loved the interactive story (more than the pre-k students a few weeks ago) and were captivated by the content and features in PebbleGo.  Can’t wait to have them explore whales with Mac’s Billy Twitters and His Blue Whale Problem next week!

Grade 2:

With students studying Homes Around the World in their Social Studies curriculum, it was time to introduce the Learners Around the World unit.  This will incorporate stories, map skills, databases, research, and – if we’re lucky – coding and creating media.  This week’s database: CultureGrams.  It’s a bit high for the average reader in the room, yet it has sections for “life as a kid” and “school”…so I read it aloud and we make it work.

Grade 3:

With Destiny being a royal pain in the rear (not it’s issue…a school-wide issue resulting in usernames/passwords changing at random), I ditched Destiny for a research-fueled/nonfiction lesson.  Katherine Applegate’s Ivan: the remarkable true story of the shopping mall gorilla captivated the students last week.  This week, I led the students on a research journey.  Focus areas included keywords, reading web summaries, and looking at the source of information (Pinterest website vs Zoo Atlanta?).  A pretty good lesson – and one that was my drop-in evaluation.

Grade 4:

This was busy, y’all.  Following last week’s reading, students were ready to research.  Armed with their iPads, they set off after a review of the 3 “articles” and a discussion of keyword and search strategies.  I created my own handout – asking students to write keywords for each story, locate websites that are helpful (or not!), and decide if the story was TRUTH or LIE.  More resources are found on the publisher’s page.

Cheers, y’all!  –arika

Library Lessons: Sep 25-29, 2017

Week 6. Time is moving right along.

PreK:

Continuing the COUNTING theme. We started, as usual, with The Name Song and Little Mouse, Little Mouse (neither are listed…too many words for the PreK children!).


These two stories were PERFECT for the PreK set.  Sergio Ruzzier’s Two Mice was both simple and complex, as there were many places for inferencing and predicting.  Mac Barnett’s Count the Monkeys was, as usual, an interactive gem.  Picking books that give opportunities to talk and move will serve you (and your little learners) well!

K/1:

Continuing the Author Study with Peter Brown.  The best part of this week’s lesson was the BRAIN question: what surprised you?  So many surprises, from Tiger walking on all four legs to getting undressed to going back to the city.  Open ended questions like these allow all students to participate without fear of being “wrong”.

Notice that this week, I left off the bottom of the spine label AND the period from the underlined title.  This was a teachable moment – it took about 90 seconds and will be part of the review for the next 2-3 months.

Grade 2:

First: reading for the sake of reading.  No agenda, no questions, no work…purely a story to enjoy.

Next: Book BINGO! More about that HERE.

Know that some of the BINGO sections were chosen to match last week’s Scavenger Hunt. Students should now know where to find Fairy/Folk Tales, series, nonfiction. Next time, I’ll add biographies and poetry to the hunt!

After sharing the goals of BINGO, I booktalked 2-4 titles that would be great fits for their BINGO board.  From titles like Ready, Freddy! to Bunjitsu Bunny to Mercy Watson, many books were getting checked out to support the BINGO board.

Grades 3/4:

Same as grade 2: reading for the sake of reading. No agenda, no work: students LOVED AKR’s Exclamation Mark.  (side note: so do I!)

Book BINGO was the big lesson, followed by booktalks and goal-setting (which BINGO column would be their first to tackle).

Some background: SO many of these students wanted to know why we weren’t doing Battle of the Books (which was done by the previous librarian).  Short answer: because we’re doing something that allows everyone to participate.  Longer answer: BINGO supports all language learners as books can be read in any language.  It allows students to achieve success if they move mid-year.  Extra copies of the same books don’t need to be purchased. Books can be in any language and from anywhere. MORE books and a wider variety of books are read with Book BINGO than in Battle (where the same 6 titles are repeatedly read).  No class time is needed to run BINGO, as compared to Battle. No extra meetings need to take place. Diverse titles are supported in BINGO (though, as an international school, diversity is already a big part of their lives).  I love that everyone – adults and students alike – can participate and succeed and grow with Book BINGO!

Cheers, y’all! –arika

Library Lessons: Sep 18-22, 2017

Week 5!  The time is flying.

PreK:

New unit: COUNTING.  We started with The Name Song, then did the Little Mouse, Little Mouse color/counting/guessing rhyme from last week (note: I always hide the mouse before they come in. My pieces are magnetic, too).  They were so excited to play this game again!  We’ll use it one more time before changing it up.  Patterns and repetition works with the littles.

Made in my long-ago days as a preschool storytime librarian!

Stories included another Pete the Cat – this time, with his four groovy buttons.  And Doreen Cronin’s counting adventure Click Clack, Splish Splash gave good opportunity to talk about what was actually happening in the story and why it was happening.  Why were the ducks sneaking?  Why was it important that the farmer was sleeping?  Building in opportunities for children to think and wonder about their reading at a young age will serve them well as they grow as readers.

You may notice our main slide doesn’t include much of this work.  Why?  Too many words/images.  I keep it simple for the pre-K’s visual needs.  More isn’t always better.

Grades K&1:

Author study: Peter Brown.  Intro song: The Name Song.  This week: My Teacher is a Monstert! (no, I am not).  No image was put on the slide…and here’s why: I forgot!  Noticing this error before the class came in, I could’ve added it, but I chose to use it as a thinking question moment.  After sitting down, students talked with knee-neighbors about what they think a teacher-monster would look like.  Ideas included sharp teeth, rough skin, purple or green, big size, pointy nails and more.  This was a perfect way to build an open-ended question into the lesson and engage all students.

Know that each week, prior to check out, we review expectations related to self-checkout and locating books (using our shelf marker, how to scan the barcodes, etc).  It takes 2-3 minutes, but I’m taking time at the beginning to reinforce and review.  One of my favorite sayings in teaching is “go slow to go fast.”  Slow down at the beginning of the year (and week 5 is still the beginning!) and work with intention to teach the skills and behaviors you really value and that will ultimately benefit the child.

Grades 2, 3, 4:

Emoji Scavenger Hunt!  After last year’s Pokemon Go to the Library hunt, I chose to edit the clues and streamline the hunt into a single hunt for all grades.  What I learned: it was perfect for grade 3 learners, a little too easy for grade 4 and too long (though not too hard) for grade 2.  But, my assessment was informal: at the end, students were asked if they found a space in the library that they didn’t know about…and 95% of students answered YES.  Success, even if they didn’t complete the hunt.

Students did the hunt with a teacher-selected partner.  The reasons partners are teacher-selected are many, but the big ones are: 1 – it eliminates fretting over “who will be my partner?”; 2 – it keeps kids focused on directions, as they’re not fretting about finding a partner; 3 – students who need specific partners (a strong reader with a student who struggles; a student who speaks Italian with the student who speaks multiple languages) can be placed together and not left out.

Full procedures for how to do the hunt are found in the Pokemon link above, including a timeline of how it looks in a 40 minute class.

This year there was a bonus question: if students finished early, they were to think of a clue I could’ve asked.  There were some great ones: where the family photos are hanging, where the daily directions are found, a cozy spot with a rooftop. These are all places in our library that they found important and meaningful.  I’d also include the E section (who knows why I left it out!), poetry, and more nonfiction.

Questions? Wonders? Please ask.  Cheers, y’all!  –arika

Library Lessons: Sep 4-8, 2017

Week 3 is in the books. With fewer classes than in previous years, it makes sense to combine grade levels to teach certain skills.

PreK

We warmed up with The Hello Name Song (thanks to Stephanie, the best music teacher ever for this hack!), with index cards for each child pre-placed on the floor. Doing this alleviates drama in locating a seat, gives a set way to begin class as the children walk in, and helps me (and them!) to learn names.  Here’s a peek of how it looks with the K class:

Theme unit: CATS (because why  not?). We talked about animals cats like and don’t like as our lead-in.

They LOVED Splat the Cat, and we had good discussion about how Splat felt using our Emoji Mood Meter. Hairy MacLairy, while full of rhyme and repetition, wasn’t as well-received.  To be honest, this was likely because I wasn’t feeling the story.  I chose it because the school has a complete collection of the books.  Bad choice.  Read what you love, and the lesson will likely be better for it.  I know better and will do better next week.

Kindergarten/Grade1

Begin with The Hello Name Song.

Unit: SEL / Dogs / Intro Author Study

 

After last week’s Dog & Bear discussion, we continued talking about how characters DO THEIR BEST with Peter Brown’s Chowder.  With a whizz-bang first illustration (the dog is on the toilet!), this story has the students in rapt attention.  The brain question of the week was tied to the school&life behavior expectations I teach in the library (BE KIND. BE SAFE. DO YOUR BEST. HELP THE REST.). Even though the school hasn’t adopted those sayings, I continue to repeat them whenever I see the children in the building.  How did Chowder do his best?  He didn’t give up when the ball got stuck in the tree.  He kept trying to find friends. He played kickball his best.

Chowder also lent itself to a wonderful SEL (social-emotional learning) discussion. As he’s excluded by other dogs, as he struggles with making a mistake, we consulted the Emoji Mood Meter to place Chowder’s moods.  SEL can happen in the library with a little bit of planning and the willingness to have the discussion.  Note that I don’t announce “we’re doing a SEL-themed lesson”…this is an unwritten, yet very purposeful, intention in many PreK/K/1 lessons.

Grade 2

SCIENCE TIME! With a unit of States of Matter happening in their classrooms, it was the perfect time to introduce Arnold Lobel’s Owl at Home.  With solids, liquids, and gases represented in the first story, The Guest, our conversation was rich.

Taking inspiration from Kyleen Beers & Robert Proubt’s Divergent Thinking, the BRAIN icon was introduced with a question stem from the book.  Asking children, “What surprised you?” was surprising in itself: one class had very flat answers while another had rich, thoughtful insight.  What a gift when professional reading works in daily life – and, in one case, with great results.  This is one resource I’ll continue to mine and incorporate into the library.

Grade 3/4

First up: booktalks!  As independent reading is the root of academic success, I’m aiming to increase the amount of books read.  One way to build interest and excitement is by booktalking.  Looking over the reading survey results from last week, I tailored the booktalks to the interests of the students.  Series like Ranger in Time and Bunjitsu Bunny were very popular, as were books like The Terrible Two, We Can’t All Aren’t RattlesnakesCrenshaw, and The Wild Robot.

The day’s big goal, though, was PASSWORDS. With Destiny logins in our future – and no central IT that sets student passwords – I chose to instruct on how to construct a STRONG or WEAK password and allow them to write their own. There was a recent article in the Wall Street Journal on how to best make a password – and it changes the rules.  Short version: write a short, 3-4 word sentence that’s important to you.  Boom: strong password.  The sentence can have a capital letter and punctuation, too. Less gibberish = easier to remember.  WIN!

Exit tickets had students writing their own password which were checked for clarity prior to the end of class.

Note: All classes did self check out, and 4th grade had 20 minutes to independently read (as their class lasts 1 hour). I sit with them during this time, reading a book, while intermittently walking around the room to check what everyone is reading and – if not reading – recommending a quick read (like a TOON graphic novel).  This worked so well for 2 4th grade EAL students in one class that they checked out the recommended quick read to read again at home!

Cheers, y’all!  –arika