Read-Aloud Tuesday: Sep 23, 2014

Welcome to Read-Aloud Tuesday!  It’s my third year of reading aloud in my son’s Montessori classroom (ages 3-6), and the second year of blogging what I choose to read aloud.

I don’t often have a theme, but this week I had some great Bear books that I picked up at the library.  They begged to be read together. Here are this week’s titles:

chus-first-day-of-school

Chu’s First Day of School by Neil Gaiman

Little panda Chu’s big [sneezing] problem is back, just in time for the first day of school.  Like many new students, Chu is nervous that the other kids won’t like him.  During class introductions, his teacher erases the board and creates a dust cloud just right for tickling Chu’s sensitive nose.  A few wordless pages show not only the chaos caused by Chu’s sneeze but the stunned, then joyous reaction of his classmates.  Perfect for preschoolers and K’s starting school, this worked exceptionally well after reading Chu’s Day last week.  Share with ages 3-6.

moonbears-pet

Moonbear’s Pet by Frank Asch

Moonbear and his friend Little Bird find a little green fish in the pond, and Moonbear takes it home.  He and Little Bird care for the pet, then observe it grow four appendages.  Bear thinks it is growing legs to be a bear, while Little Bird thinks it’s growing wings to be a bird. This argument puts their friendship in jeopardy until the true animal reveals himself.  A wonderful introduction to the life cycle of the frog for the youngest learners with two characters not afraid to make mistakes.  Share with ages 2-6.

more-bears-kenn-nesbitt

More Bears! by Kenn Nesbitt

The narrator, an author writing the story, is quite clear: there will be no bears.  But wait – who is that asking for more bears?  The children?  Repeated requests for “more bears!” eventually persuade the author to add one, then two, then more-more-MORE BEARS!  When they take over every inch of space, though, what will the author do?  Interactive and zany, this creative circle story will keep audiences engaged.  The ending could lead to a great writing activity for older students.  Share with ages 4-8.

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